The Elixir of Life

Inspired by the ancient alchemists of our past, I myself am always in search of the of life. I’ve always had a fascination with wine as it’s the only commercial product I know of that represents the true essence of nature. Talk to any real winemaker, and you’ll realize creating wine is an artistic process of allowing nature to run its course, and as the winemaker, you become a part of the process rather than controlling it. You become one with nature, which is what in essence happens when you consume the product, thereby transferring the enlightenment full circle.

This product represents so much, from the benefits, to the social cohesion, to the lifestyle, to bioenergy, organic growing, and ecolistic spirituality that vineyards represent. Wine seems to be a unifier of the world in the emerging sustainable global economy. I like to call it the Human Elixir.

Travel & Leisure magazine recently contacted us info on green wineries for an Wine Elixirarticle they’re writing, which was really exciting for us. Mostly because we started this company with a passion for the sustainable movement. With our connections in the wine industry and our limited business experience, we found an avenue with wine to be a natural fit. Now, after a few years and a few brands, we’re ready to connect with companies doing amazing things to change our environment and change our health. We want to work with cutting edge wineries and vineyards above all, as well as other sustainable businesses to help create a new type of sustainable marketplace… a millennial marketplace… a taste marketplace.

Seriously tho, can’t you see vineyards and wineries becoming the poster child for the movement? And not just a marketing ploy, but actually turning these beautiful places into the pinnacle of harmonization between man and nature that can then spread around the globe. You’re already seeing wineries pop up in every imaginable country and state — lets heal the earth, right?

What if we started planting more than just grapes… organic fruits and vegetables… terraform the soil with mycelium making it ultra healthy and inhabitable. Algae farms and the power of solar and wind on the vast expanse of beautiful land that encompasses a winery… more so, create an explosion of tourism to these spiritual meccas, where people come to feel their oneness with nature… to have an experience and to embrace a new global spirituality we like to call ecolism.

With all the great liquid, energy, and tourism, these estates could be quite profitable and could help wine emerge as our world’s elixir of life!

 

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Posted in Lifestyle | 3 Comments »

  • http://tastevine.com Ruarri

    Yeah – its all very well companies having corporate social responsibility programmes, but you’re right, too often its just contrived bullsh*t and a cover up for something worse.

    Many farmers plant a crop one year, and leave the land fallow the next with a crop like lentils to re-nitrogenate the soil. Wineries can’t afford off years – and its in their interests to keep the soil fertile because vines start producing their best grapes the older they get and need to be harvested every year. Generally once a good set of vines is laid down the safety of the soil is guaranteed.

    Many farmers get criticised for over-irrigating, however wine is not a culprit of this – as with new sub-terranean drip-feed systems its able to preserve water tables.

    Spiritual meccas is an interesting point… in Tuscany they have holidays to wineries where you can learn to cook… but there’s no reason that wineries can’t double up as bed and breakfast joints and have yoga retreats. Ultimately wine ties in well with a crunchy granola kind of lifestyle…

    Wine is not a mono-schematic product offering – and generally wines encompass the essence of a region, a family history, a story and a group of people invovled within all or some of those things… wineries can diversify their brand offering to become venues for summer music-festivals, winter retreats, young-persons culinary weekends and spiritual retreats.

    In South Africa, spends a summer working on the wineries – and in Europe, backpackers are drawn to wineries to pick grapes for free in a trade-off for free accomodation, wine and food in the evenings. Certain tight-fisted California winemakers are all to content to nip over the border pre-harvest and pick up some youg mexicans in Tijuana and pay them nothing before depositing them back in their own country once services have been rendered. However – there is a major missed opportunity here… whilst Diesel may not want consumers seeing how their jeans are made; if you actually involve the public in the process of making wine you’re likely to make them more interested in it rather than less so – unlike programs like Meet your Meat which make people less interested in beef by showing how its made.

    Som groups of political die-hards forge a life-long love for politics by giving up a summer to work for the Obama campaign; or become pamphleteers for Ron Paul or what have you. Methinks many a young traveller in the US would be willing to give a summer to work on a winery – and through that process become a lifelong brand advocate and young millenial wine diplomat.

  • http://tastevine.com Ruarri

    Yeah – its all very well companies having corporate social responsibility programmes, but you’re right, too often its just contrived bullsh*t and a cover up for something worse.

    Many farmers plant a crop one year, and leave the land fallow the next with a crop like lentils to re-nitrogenate the soil. Wineries can’t afford off years – and its in their interests to keep the soil fertile because vines start producing their best grapes the older they get and need to be harvested every year. Generally once a good set of vines is laid down the safety of the soil is guaranteed.

    Many farmers get criticised for over-irrigating, however wine is not a culprit of this – as with new sub-terranean drip-feed systems its able to preserve water tables.

    Spiritual meccas is an interesting point… in Tuscany they have holidays to wineries where you can learn to cook… but there’s no reason that wineries can’t double up as bed and breakfast joints and have yoga retreats. Ultimately wine ties in well with a crunchy granola kind of lifestyle…

    Wine is not a mono-schematic product offering – and generally wines encompass the essence of a region, a family history, a story and a group of people invovled within all or some of those things… wineries can diversify their brand offering to become venues for summer music-festivals, winter retreats, young-persons culinary weekends and spiritual retreats.

    In South Africa, spends a summer working on the wineries – and in Europe, backpackers are drawn to wineries to pick grapes for free in a trade-off for free accomodation, wine and food in the evenings. Certain tight-fisted California winemakers are all to content to nip over the border pre-harvest and pick up some youg mexicans in Tijuana and pay them nothing before depositing them back in their own country once services have been rendered. However – there is a major missed opportunity here… whilst Diesel may not want consumers seeing how their jeans are made; if you actually involve the public in the process of making wine you’re likely to make them more interested in it rather than less so – unlike programs like Meet your Meat which make people less interested in beef by showing how its made.

    Som groups of political die-hards forge a life-long love for politics by giving up a summer to work for the Obama campaign; or become pamphleteers for Ron Paul or what have you. Methinks many a young traveller in the US would be willing to give a summer to work on a winery – and through that process become a lifelong brand advocate and young millenial wine diplomat.

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