Wine Blogger Wednesday: Languedoc-Roussillon

This was a great task – purely because the wines from Languedoc-Roussillon have not been hyped, dsc00394.JPGand so, like Chablis, it represents some of the best value wines that the country produces – providing affordable luxury. In an effort to connect food and , I combdsc00395.JPGined Wine Blogger Wednesday with They Go Really Well Together #1, and I must be honest that my choice of wine was far better than my food enginuity. As I say, the Garlic dipped in mocha was interesting – but I was glad to have the General Billy’s Languedoc selection to wash it down! Interestingly, the Syrah and Grenache were quite complimentary to both coffee and garlic.

My first wine was the Domain Clavel ($17.99), followed by General Billy’s ($10.99); and then there were three unexpected last minute entries: Gerard Bertrand‘s 2003 Tautavel Rousillon ($14.99); Domaine De Nizas’ 2006 Rosè ($12.99) and finally, a wine that will definitely be in the USA soon – Chateau Capion’s Capion Rouge.

For me, although all the wines were exceptional Рthe winner was the Domaine De Nizas Рand I say this for two reasons: recently the weather has been hotting up, and I like to save spicy red wines for the winter, and Rose is a great crossover; and lastly because I think that America needs to push aside the White Zinfandel and whole-heartedly embrace Ros̬ blush wines.

Aestheti95467_bottle1.jpgcally, Rosè is beautiful, and the notion of the skins being left for 16 hours without punch down maceration is a delicate pink, violet and opague-garnet hue. Secondly, the aroma of a real blush wine is completely unique: On the nose one can get a hint of red berry or candied fruit, whilst on the palat there’s the crisp, clean and dry essence of a white. Rosè’s are perfect wines for watching the sun set – or for the beginning of an evening.

The 2006 Domaine de Nizas Ros̬ is one of my new favorites and is my official choice for Wine Bloger Wednesday #33 The wine is like pink nectar with sweet red wine essences on the nose; whilst the palat introduces the minerality and creamy yet dry mouth feel. The composition is 40 % Syrah, 40 % Grenache and 20 % Mourv̬dre Рalmost identical to the Domaine Clavel, except from an interest point of view, its amazing to see the difference between extended skin contact compared to just 16 hours. Drinking them side by side one can see how great an impact winemakers have on their creations.

By the way – the flight-special to Carcasonne is still going, so hopefully Weingolb’s #33 will inspire some of you to make the trip: for an anniversary present, or just because, there are few places in the world as suited to the adventurous wine lover. Cheerz!

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Posted in Wine, Wine Review | 4 Comments »

  • http://weingolb.blogspot.com Marcus

    Excellent… Here I happen upon someone taking on a rosé for WBW 33 (among other bottles too — nice initiative Ruarri!). I’ll be sure to highlight this prominently in the round-up, which I am working this weekend. I especially like how you looked at the red that had the same grapes as the rosé.

    How about thoughts on the Capion? Seriously, I almost bought the Capion red called Le Juge 2001 last week but ruled it out for something else at the last moment. I just haven’t heard that much about this domaine… what can you share with me? How did you get introduced to it?

    Thanks,
    Marcus

  • http://weingolb.blogspot.com Marcus

    Excellent… Here I happen upon someone taking on a rosé for WBW 33 (among other bottles too — nice initiative Ruarri!). I’ll be sure to highlight this prominently in the round-up, which I am working this weekend. I especially like how you looked at the red that had the same grapes as the rosé.

    How about thoughts on the Capion? Seriously, I almost bought the Capion red called Le Juge 2001 last week but ruled it out for something else at the last moment. I just haven’t heard that much about this domaine… what can you share with me? How did you get introduced to it?

    Thanks,
    Marcus

  • http://www.grapethinking.com Ruarri

    I learned about Capion through their association with one of my favourite South African wineries – Springfield. Incidentally, if you have the chace to get your hands on a bottle of Springfield 2003 Whole Berry Cabernet: beg, borrow or steal.

    Anyhow, Grapethinking became interested in Capion, quite coincidentally at the time of your topic for WBW #33. We’re interested in Languedoc, namely for the reasons that came up over the course of WBW – which was high quality combined with affordability.

    Languedoc, as a geo-historical ere has much influence on many Romantic poets, and was one of the birth places of sensual pleasures from spoken word poetry, to fine cheese and of course – great wine.

    Of course, being a lover of French cafe culture, Carcassonne has always captured my imagination. I’m still under 25, and to be honest, Burgundy and Sancerre intimidate me a little bit. I just feel I’ve never had enough money to understand them – and that there’s a lot more politics involved in terms of production, appelation and price-hiking. Languedoc seems more pure to me – and is untouched by the taint that a globalised market can inject into a region kissed with the mixed blessing of high-praise and high demand.

    Chateau Capion is commited to portraying the versatility of the area – and does a good job with producing a good range of wines that truly represent the terroir and flavour of the area. You can find out more about them at: http://www.chateaucapion.com/

    Thanks for the great WBW! Perhaps Grapethinking can host one for South African wine in the not too distant future.

    Take care.

    Regards,

    Ruarri

  • http://www.grapethinking.com Ruarri

    I learned about Capion through their association with one of my favourite South African wineries – Springfield. Incidentally, if you have the chace to get your hands on a bottle of Springfield 2003 Whole Berry Cabernet: beg, borrow or steal.

    Anyhow, Grapethinking became interested in Capion, quite coincidentally at the time of your topic for WBW #33. We’re interested in Languedoc, namely for the reasons that came up over the course of WBW – which was high quality combined with affordability.

    Languedoc, as a geo-historical ere has much influence on many Romantic poets, and was one of the birth places of sensual pleasures from spoken word poetry, to fine cheese and of course – great wine.

    Of course, being a lover of French cafe culture, Carcassonne has always captured my imagination. I’m still under 25, and to be honest, Burgundy and Sancerre intimidate me a little bit. I just feel I’ve never had enough money to understand them – and that there’s a lot more politics involved in terms of production, appelation and price-hiking. Languedoc seems more pure to me – and is untouched by the taint that a globalised market can inject into a region kissed with the mixed blessing of high-praise and high demand.

    Chateau Capion is commited to portraying the versatility of the area – and does a good job with producing a good range of wines that truly represent the terroir and flavour of the area. You can find out more about them at: http://www.chateaucapion.com/

    Thanks for the great WBW! Perhaps Grapethinking can host one for South African wine in the not too distant future.

    Take care.

    Regards,

    Ruarri

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