Duck Walk Vineyards

Duck Walk VineyardThe East end of is surrounded by an array of vineyards unknown to many. With open doors and no reservations necessary, these vineyards make it possible and accessible to sample and enjoy their love and hard work. The Hamptons have a reputation of being overpriced and I’ll agree on that for the most part, except when it comes to . Here is one way of coming out to the Hamptons and being able to indulge.

I recently visited Duck Walk Vineyards in Watermill. Compared with the 10 Euro a tour pricing in Champagne, four dollars to sample eight wines seemed more than reasonable. An additional two dollars a wine is also available for the wines from their Reserve list. What we sampled was nothing out of the ordinary but enjoyable at the same respect. Would I go and order a bottle of their wines in a restaurant? I’m leaning towards no on this one, but I would buy this wine to enjoy at home. The staff was friendly and gave space in between tastings in order for you to enjoy and actually taste the wine. I fully appreciated this; I didn’t feel rushed or as if I was taking up a spot.

The dessert wines that we tasted stood out the most for me. The favorite of the group would have to be the Blueberry Port, which was served with a piece of chocolate. We were instructed to take a sip of the wine then take a bite of the chocolate and then go back and take another sip. This was absolutely delicious. There is a local chocolatier who uses this Blueberry Port in one of his chocolates, oddly enough named Blueberry Port. The other dessert wines were Aphrodite, a late harvest Gewurztraminer and Boysenberry Dessert Wine buy paroxetine 20mg.

In terms of the Reserve list, they were sold out of their Ice Wine.  Of course this saddened my heart a bit but I moved on to the Meritage, a new release, described as “A Bordeaux wine of enormous complexity. A hand crafted wine with an extremely long ageing potential.� My initial thought after this wine was ‘Steak�. Now I’m not a huge steak person. Once in a while I’ll crave steak, but if I see it on the menu my mouth doesn’t water. This wine with its complex tannins, full body and long finish could definitely stand up to a nice piece of meat.

In terms of the other wines they produce, cheese is the way to go. This is especially true for the dessert wines. What cheese? It honestly doesn’t matter. If you’re cheese shy then go to your local market and choose three cheeses you’ve never sampled before and try them.  Trust me, I wouldn’t steer you wrong. In general Duck Walk is appropriately priced, so why not try a bottle or two.  Enjoy and as always, Wine Your Diet.

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Posted in Lifestyle | 12 Comments »

  • Luke

    How could you suggest these wines? They are among the worst made on Long Island.

    If you’re in the Hamptons, go to Wolffer or Channing Daughters. The wines cost a bit more (maybe too much in some cases) but they are so much better.

  • Luke

    How could you suggest these wines? They are among the worst made on Long Island.

    If you’re in the Hamptons, go to Wolffer or Channing Daughters. The wines cost a bit more (maybe too much in some cases) but they are so much better.

  • Meghan

    Luke thank you for your question. I hope you have tasted other wines in order to back up your statement. Because if you have then you would know that there is a lot of crap being produced in L.I. And this does include Wolffer and Channing Daughters. The unfortunate thing about theses 2 vineyards is that they are more costly. Sure they have great wine too, but you have to search. And the same goes for Duck Walk and other Long Island vineyards.
    In California there is a producer, Bogle, who makes an absolutely delicious Petite Syrah, but that is about it. If you only have tried their Merlot first then you would be telling me that Bogle is amongst the worst in California. It would be like me telling you that if you’re in California then you should drink Chalk Hill or Silver Oak.
    There are 2 major things I take into account when writing about wine. First, of course, do I enjoy drinking the wine. And then do i enjoy drinking this wine at this price fix. Wolfer and Channing Daughters, though good wines, are not an exceptional wine at there price fix. Not that I’m saying Duck Walk is, but as I said above, these wines are “nothing out of the ordinary but enjoyable at the same respect.” And this partially has to do with the reasonable price. If it was in the $15 to $20 range than no thank you I would never want to revisit this wine.
    Keep an open mind and I temp you to go buy a wine from a producer that you didn’t enjoy, but in a different varietal. You may see things differently or you may still not enjoy this producer. It’s all trial and error, and who knows you might just learn a little something about your palate.

  • Meghan

    Luke thank you for your question. I hope you have tasted other wines in order to back up your statement. Because if you have then you would know that there is a lot of crap being produced in L.I. And this does include Wolffer and Channing Daughters. The unfortunate thing about theses 2 vineyards is that they are more costly. Sure they have great wine too, but you have to search. And the same goes for Duck Walk and other Long Island vineyards.
    In California there is a producer, Bogle, who makes an absolutely delicious Petite Syrah, but that is about it. If you only have tried their Merlot first then you would be telling me that Bogle is amongst the worst in California. It would be like me telling you that if you’re in California then you should drink Chalk Hill or Silver Oak.
    There are 2 major things I take into account when writing about wine. First, of course, do I enjoy drinking the wine. And then do i enjoy drinking this wine at this price fix. Wolfer and Channing Daughters, though good wines, are not an exceptional wine at there price fix. Not that I’m saying Duck Walk is, but as I said above, these wines are “nothing out of the ordinary but enjoyable at the same respect.” And this partially has to do with the reasonable price. If it was in the $15 to $20 range than no thank you I would never want to revisit this wine.
    Keep an open mind and I temp you to go buy a wine from a producer that you didn’t enjoy, but in a different varietal. You may see things differently or you may still not enjoy this producer. It’s all trial and error, and who knows you might just learn a little something about your palate.

  • Luke

    What wine would you consider the Bogle Petite Sirah of Duck Walk? I’ve tasted at every Long Island winery numerous times and have never found anything I could even swallow at Duck Walk.

    You shouldn’t respond to comments as though your readers are idiots. Some of us know plenty about wine.

    No one is suggesting that Wolffer or Channings is perfect, but there are values at each that are far better than anything you’ll find at Duck Walk.

    There are other awful wineries on Long Island, but you didn’t mention them as good ones. So I didn’t bother mentioning it.

  • Luke

    What wine would you consider the Bogle Petite Sirah of Duck Walk? I’ve tasted at every Long Island winery numerous times and have never found anything I could even swallow at Duck Walk.

    You shouldn’t respond to comments as though your readers are idiots. Some of us know plenty about wine.

    No one is suggesting that Wolffer or Channings is perfect, but there are values at each that are far better than anything you’ll find at Duck Walk.

    There are other awful wineries on Long Island, but you didn’t mention them as good ones. So I didn’t bother mentioning it.

  • greg

    damn sounds like L.I. wine sucks

  • greg

    damn sounds like L.I. wine sucks

  • http://tastevine.com Jake

    Who would have thought that 2 people would have different opinions about the same wine… ? One of the beauties of wine is there rarely is a cut and dry awesome vs. sucks. Its a very personal item that relies completely on the individual pallet of the person consuming. Obviously enough people enjoy Duck Walk, or they would be out of business.

    Just another case in point that the best recommendations are those in which the person recommending (or receiving) shares your personal taste. (shameless plug – http://tastevine.com)

  • http://tastevine.com Jake

    Who would have thought that 2 people would have different opinions about the same wine… ? One of the beauties of wine is there rarely is a cut and dry awesome vs. sucks. Its a very personal item that relies completely on the individual pallet of the person consuming. Obviously enough people enjoy Duck Walk, or they would be out of business.

    Just another case in point that the best recommendations are those in which the person recommending (or receiving) shares your personal taste. (shameless plug – http://tastevine.com)

  • http://tastevine.com Ruarri

    agreed – sometimes there’s more to learn from bad wine/ wine one doesn’t enjoy, than there is to learn from good wine. Sometimes knowing what you don’t like helps define the universe a bit more clearly. whilst in the UK – people are crazy about Rose’ wines – and a lot of bars serve E&J Gallo White Zine… which somehow is not stigmatised here – and turned my nose up for many months and came across as a real snob.

    Basically I don’t think there’s good and bad… its just a matter of taste.

    Luke I agree there are some really wineries. But wine is also about provoking debate and being unconventional. The Australians often do this and have caused all sorts of a stir with things like Sparkling Shiraz.

    As a rule of thumb in regards to Long Island, I always turn to Lenn Thompson http://lennthompson.typepad.com/ – who knows pretty much everything there is to know about LI.

    LI wines and New York state wines don’t get the attention they deserve in my opinion – sure there’s the conventionall punted stuff like Konstantin Frank, Salmon Run, Wolffer and the Finger-Lake stuff – but New York also has its own varietals, as well as a totally new approach to dry riesling…

    Also – to Meg’s credit – tasting wine in situ is very special. So much of wine is about ambience… and often tasting on the farm just makes it taste better… much like Guinness tastes better in Dublin!

    There are many stories about crafty Bordeaux winemakers entertaining MW’s in their cellar who do blind-tastings… and some people will become convinced they’re sampling a Margeaux – and other will swear is Rothschild… and in the end the winemaker reveals its all been Chilean boxwine…

    I think the moral of the story is that its all about what tastes good to you at the time that you drink it… and as Jake says, its down to personal taste.

  • http://tastevine.com Ruarri

    agreed – sometimes there’s more to learn from bad wine/ wine one doesn’t enjoy, than there is to learn from good wine. Sometimes knowing what you don’t like helps define the universe a bit more clearly. whilst in the UK – people are crazy about Rose’ wines – and a lot of bars serve E&J Gallo White Zine… which somehow is not stigmatised here – and turned my nose up for many months and came across as a real snob.

    Basically I don’t think there’s good and bad… its just a matter of taste.

    Luke I agree there are some really wineries. But wine is also about provoking debate and being unconventional. The Australians often do this and have caused all sorts of a stir with things like Sparkling Shiraz.

    As a rule of thumb in regards to Long Island, I always turn to Lenn Thompson http://lennthompson.typepad.com/ – who knows pretty much everything there is to know about LI.

    LI wines and New York state wines don’t get the attention they deserve in my opinion – sure there’s the conventionall punted stuff like Konstantin Frank, Salmon Run, Wolffer and the Finger-Lake stuff – but New York also has its own varietals, as well as a totally new approach to dry riesling…

    Also – to Meg’s credit – tasting wine in situ is very special. So much of wine is about ambience… and often tasting on the farm just makes it taste better… much like Guinness tastes better in Dublin!

    There are many stories about crafty Bordeaux winemakers entertaining MW’s in their cellar who do blind-tastings… and some people will become convinced they’re sampling a Margeaux – and other will swear is Rothschild… and in the end the winemaker reveals its all been Chilean boxwine…

    I think the moral of the story is that its all about what tastes good to you at the time that you drink it… and as Jake says, its down to personal taste.

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